Connecticut Vaccinations & Immunizations

Docs Urgent Care provides various locations across Connecticut with vaccination & immunizations on a walk-in basis clinics. Each of our offices are headed by board-certified providers ready to treat you. Our urgent care clinic offers only the highest-quality care for affordable prices. We accept most insurance.

QUALITY, AFFORDABLE CARE

DOCS URGENT CARE – BETHEL

ADDRESS
6 Stony Hill Rd.
Bethel, CT 06801

PHONE
(203) 408-6409

FAX
(203) 917-4930

HOURS
WEEKDAYS : 8AM-8PM
WEEKENDS : 8AM-4PM

ROUTINE VACCINATIONS in Connecticut

It’s highly advised that babies, adolescents, and adults follow the current vaccination schedule and make sure to stay up to date. Boosters should be taken unless otherwise told by your doctor. For details about missed vaccinations or an alternative schedule, talk with our physicians at your local Connecticut clinic.

Common Routine Adult Vaccines Include:
  • Hepatitis A (HEP A)
  • Hepatitis B (HEP B)
  • TD (Tetanus-Diphtheria)
  • TDAP (Whooping Cough)
  • Flu (Influenza)
  • HPV (Human Papillomavirus)
  • Shingles (Herpes Zoster)
  • Pneumonia (Pneumococcal)
  • Meningitis (Meningococcal)
All Available Vaccinations:
  • Hepatitis A (Adult)
  • Hepatitis A (Pediatric)
  • Hepatitis B (Adult)
  • Hepatitis B (Pediatric)
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • MMR
  • Menactra
  • Zostavax (Shingles)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Pneumococcal
  • PPD
  • Rabies Vaccination
  • Tetanus Diphtheria (TD)
  • Tetanus Diphtheria Pertussis (TDAP)
  • Typhoid
  • Twinrix (Hep A & B Combination)
  • Typhoid
  • Varicella
  • yellow Fever
  • Gardasil
  • B-12
  • Ceftriaxone
  • Kenalog-10
  • Phenergan
  • Solu-Medrol
  • Toradol
  • Benadryl

Adolescent Vaccinations

At birth you are given your first vaccine. The next vaccinations are given at intervals until you’ve taken all of them. Each person receives immunizations based on the schedule recommended by the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Academy of Family Physicians.

  • TD (Tetanus-Diphtheria)
  • Meningitis (Meningococcal)
  • HPV (Human Papillomavirus)
  • TDAP (Whooping Cough)
  • FLU (Influenza)
  • MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)
  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Pneumonia (Pneumococcal)
  • Hepatitis A (HEP A)
  • Hepatitis B (HEP B)
All Available Vaccinations:

Elderly Vaccinations

Individuals 65 years and older are at increased risk for many vaccine-preventable diseases. Older adults have a weakened immune system that leaves them at a greater risk of catching preventable diseases. Vaccines protect you from serious diseases and associated comorbidities. Visit your local DOCS Urgent Care to learn how you can protect your overall health and well being.

  • Flu (Influenza)
  • Shingles (Herpes Zoster)
  • Pneumonia (Pneumococcal)
  • TD (Tetanus-Diphtheria)
  • TDAP (Whooping Cough)
  • Hepatitis A (HEP A)
  • Hepatitis B (HEP B)
  • MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)

Travel Vaccinations

Before traveling to a different country, you have to get the necessary travel vaccinations because you’re going to be in a whole new climate. This new area will have bacteria and viruses that you’ve never been exposed to before. To prevent the onset and spreading of illnesses, it’s important that you be vaccinated before hopping on a plane. Find out which vaccinations you need by checking out the CDC Health Travel Site for more details. When you know which immunizations you require, visit your local Connecticut DOCS Urgent care to get your travel vaccinations.

Common Travel Vaccinations Include:

  • Yellow Fever
  • Meningitis (Meningococcal)
  • Japanese Encephalitis
  • Typhoid
  • Rabies
  • Polio
  • Hepatitis A  (HEP A)
  • Hepatitis B (HEP B)
  • Hepatitis A/ Hepatitis B Combination

What to Know About Vaccinations & Immunizations

How Vaccinations Work

When a disease enters your body, it begins to reproduce itself and spread throughout. Your immune system recognizes this as foreign invaders and will attempt to combat the infection by making antibodies. The antibodies are responsible for destroying the germs. Unfortunately, they don’t act fast enough to prevent you from becoming sick, but by attacking the germs, the antibodies help you get well faster.

The secondary job of antibodies is to protect your body from future infections of the same disease. The created antibodies will remain in your bloodstream and will fight off the same germs if they try to infect you again––even after many years. Now that the antibodies have fought these germs before, they will destroy them before they have the chance to make you sick. This is known as immunity, which is exactly what vaccines are used for. Immunity is why the majority of people experience diseases like measles or chickenpox only once, even if you become exposed again.

Vaccines help your body go straight to the second step. Instead of experiencing the illness once, vaccines help you develop immunity without getting sick. Vaccines are made from the same germs that cause common diseases. For example, the flu vaccine is made from the flu virus. However, the germs in vaccines are either killed or greatly weakened so you won’t feel the effects of the illness.

Vaccines are introduced to your body through injection. The immune system reacts to the germs in the vaccine in a similar way to how it would if it were being invaded by the actual disease––by making antibodies. The antibodies destroy the germs inside the vaccine just as they would with the disease germs. Think of it as a training exercise. The antibodies then stay in your body, which gives you immunity. If you ever become exposed to the disease, the antibodies created from the vaccine will be there to protect you.

Why Are Vaccinations Important?

Most vaccine-preventable diseases are spread from person to person, which means that if one person in a certain location gets an infectious disease, they can easily spread it to others. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention an individual can help stop the spread of certain diseases through vaccination. If more people are vaccinated, then there’s fewer opportunities for vaccine-preventable diseases to spread.

Overall, vaccinations keep you healthy and protect not just you but the people around you. Vaccines are extremely important for everyone. VIsit or call your local DOCS Urgent Care.

Do Adults Need VAccinations?

Yes. Vaccinations are important for adults, elderly people and children alike. Adults need vaccines because vaccine immunity may have diminished over time and a person will need a booster shot to enhance protection.

For example, it’s necessary to get a tetanus (Tdap) booster every 10 years or when your doctor feels it’s necessary for your health. Other illnesses don’t make an appearance until later in life, like shingles. Find out further information by talking with our team at one of our various Connecticut locations.

The Care When You Need It in Connecticut

DOCS Urgent Care is proud to be Connecticut’s trusted health care clinic. DOCS is run by board-certified health care providers. Our goal is to give the highest quality care to our patients while providing affordable care.